Richard Heydarian, binira si Mocha Uson: Public service, not politics, is my vocation | Change Scamming
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Richard Heydarian, binira si Mocha Uson: Public service, not politics, is my vocation

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Richard Heydarian, binira si Mocha Uson: Public service, not politics, is my vocation

Pinalagan ng foreign policy specialist at political analyst na si Richard Heydarian ang komento sa kanya ni PCOO Assistant Secretary Mocha Uson matapos tawagin ito na ‘dilawan’.

Nag-react si Uson sa pahayag ni Heydarian kaugnay sa partisan politics.

“Why can’t some people accept the fact that not all of us Filipinos belong to the two opposing camps of ‘Dilawan’ and DDS. The vast majority of us Filipinos only want the best for our country, and couldn’t care less about your partisan politics,” ani Heydarian.

Ayon kay Uson, ikinahihiya umano ni Heydarian ang pagiging ‘dilawan’ at nagpe-pretend ito na walang pinapanigan.

“Ang problema kasi kinahihiya niyo na dilaw kayo. Dahil puro kapalpakan ginawa ng amo niyo noon. So ngayon pretending kayo na nasa gitna na kayo. Wag nga kami!” ani Uson.

Itinanggi ni Heydarian na ‘dilawan’ o tagasuporta ng Aquino administration.

“I am not the one who campaigned all the way for a presidential candidate and/or joined any specific administration to be accountable for its supposed ‘kapalpakan’,” ani Heydarian.

Ibinida ni Heydarian na hindi siya tumanggap o naghangad ng posisyon sa pamahalaan para lang ibahagi ang kanyang kaalaman pagdating sa foreign policy at iba pang isyu.

“I served as a simple university teacher throughout the years, wrote independently to reflect my own ideas about the world, testified at the Congress on how to protect our territory integrity, spoke at leading universities and conferences around the world to explain our national point of view, and provided policy advice to cabinet members from different administrations in my capacity as a foreign policy specialist,” ani Heydarian.

“No positions in government. No favors. No nothing. Just service to the country… Public service, not politics, is my vocation,” dagdag pa ni Heydarian.

Iginiit ni Heydarian na naging kritikal siya sa administrasyong Aquino at maging sa kasalukuyang gobyerno ni President Rodrigo Duterte. Nagsalita rin siya sa ‘Dutertenomics’ forum.

“I repeatedly criticized the previous Aquino administration for its many failures throughout the years… But we can’t also deny the accomplishments of the previous administrations. And mind you: Whenever appropriate, I encouraged and provided advice on how to make good policies work under the current administration,” ani Heydarian.

Ayon kay Heydarian, kung ituturing ni Uson ang mga sumasalungat sa polisiya ng administrasyong Duterte ay dilawan, marahil halos lahat ng mga Pilipino ay kaanib na rito, bunsod ng samu’t saring isyu na kinahaharap ngayon ng pamahalaan.

“At the rate we’re going, a super-majority of the population, who have expressed contrarian views on West Philippine Sea, federalism, and most urgent issues (i.e., inflation) in authoritative surveys, could end up in the “dilaw” category,” ani Heydarian.

Para kay Heydarian, ibinabahagi lamang niya ang kanyang sentimyento bilang isang ordinaryong tao.

“I am just an ordinary citizen expressing my views and hopes, which I believe are shared by many who are not politically active or in the government,” ani Heydarian.

Basahin ang buong sagot ni Heydarian kay Uson:

Dear Asec. Mocha

I don’t know if this is you or some folks in your staff running the blog, but with all due respect, speaking of “amo”, I am not the one who campaigned all the way for a presidential candidate and/or joined any specific administration to be accountable for its supposed ‘kapalpakan’. There is nothing wrong with campaigning for anyone or joining any government of course, but let’s get those basic facts straight at least.

In my case, I served as a simple university teacher throughout the years, wrote independently to reflect my own ideas about the world, testified at the Congress on how to protect our territory integrity, spoke at leading universities and conferences around the world to explain our national point of view, and provided policy advice to cabinet members from different administrations in my capacity as a foreign policy specialist. No positions in government. No favors. No nothing. Just service to the country. And it was in that non-partisan-for-the-country capacity that I was awarded as Ten outstanding Young Men (TOYM) in the Philippines in 2016, with no less than President Duterte overseeing the event in Malacanang. Public service, not politics, is my vocation.

Thus, I find it strange for you to brand me as “Dilaw”, considering that I repeatedly criticized the previous Aquino administration for its many failures throughout the years (I can post you all my critical articles about the previous administration if you wish, or there is always Google). But we can’t also deny the accomplishments of the previous administrations. And mind you: Whenever appropriate, I encouraged and provided advice on how to make good policies work under the current administration (e.g., check my speech at the Dutertenomics Forum, among others).

I have of course criticized this administration whenever, in my judgment, I believed it acted contrary to the collective interest or fundamental principles of our constitution. My stance on the war on drugs, on the West Philippine Sea, and on a whole number of issues is crystal clear and transparent. And, to be clear, I speak for myself, when I deploy what I believe are legitimate criticisms. No government or leader is perfect after all, right?

So let’s not be unfair by branding any person as “dilaw” or whatnot just because they express a contrarian view. And to be clear, who are the “dilaw” anyway? At the rate we’re going, a super-majority of the population, who have expressed contrarian views on West Philippine Sea, federalism, and most urgent issues (i.e., inflation) in authoritative surveys, could end up in the “dilaw” category.

I am sorry if my comment about ‘partisan politics’ offended you or anyone in the government or in the political scene, including those from the previous administration and its staunch supporters. I am neither ‘neutral’ nor indifferent to the predicaments of our country. To the contrary, I deeply care about how to help solve those problems in a smart, evidence-based and conscientious way. But what I don’t agree with is the false binary narrative that all Filipinos belong to either one camp or the other. That is far from truth, since we can help our country perhaps even more by transcending partisan politics, instead of getting drowned in it.

Now, this doesn’t mean that by belonging to the DDS or “Dilawan” camp one is necessarily reneging on his/her duties as a citizen. I believe there are countless well-meaning citizens who identify with either of the two camps. But I beg to disagree with the suggestion or assertion that any of the two camps hold monopoly over good citizenship and public service.

I am just an ordinary citizen expressing my views and hopes, which I believe are shared by many who are not politically active or in the government. I hope you will respect my right to express my views in that capacity. I never insulted you, and in many occasions I pushed back against what I believe were unfair attacks on you.

Now if you care about the country, rather than specific groups or individuals, I am always more than happy to discuss how to help our beloved country together. Let’s work together for policies that truly help the Filipino people, instead of wasting our time on Social Media wars.

There is a lot to be done in this country, and recent years have seen many setbacks, including rising inflation, expanding current account deficit, declining currency, falling exports, diplomatic tensions with traditional friends and partners, concerns over erosion of rule of law, and, among others, the continued militarization of the disputes in the West Philippines Sea.

It’s a long list. But we should do what we can to unite — rather than dividing this country through polarizing rhetoric and branding and denigrating others, who don’t share our point of view.

In our democracy, we should be able to agree to disagree without resorting to name-calling and insults and baseless accusations. What we need is genuine and facts-based dialogue based on good will for the interest of our country.

Martin has my number and contact if ever you are interested in reaching out to me.

Sincerely yours,

Chad

 

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